ELHA members to preview new Hungarian museum

Diggin’ Up Your Roots is a column about Livingston Parish history and genealogy with excerpts from the Edward Livingston Historical Association (ELHA) monthly newsletter by editor Clark Forrest.

Unearth Your Roots with Clark Forrest

Unearth Your Roots with Clark Forrest

Fellow History Buffs, I know that changing our regular ELHA meeting location is a risk because we’re all creatures of habit, but the risk will be worth it for our group to tour the Livingston Parish’s newest museum on Aug. 18. It is located south of I-12 on LA Hwy 43. It is on the right side going to Springfield, and if you get to the new Livingston-Springfield Library, also on the right, you will have driven too far south!
The Hungarian Settlement Museum president Mr. Alex Kropog and his wife, Royanne, will be our tour guides. She is the author of the book, The Story of Arpadhon: Hungarian Settlement, Louisiana, 1896-2006.
Speaker recap: The topic of our June speaker, Mr. John Hickey, was “The Canary Islanders of Louisiana.” We appreciate his taking time to share his extensive knowledge of this subject with us. His presentation brought a number of new faces to our meeting which was impressive. And our regular dedicated genealogists found his tried research techniques on spelling and pronunciation of names, etc., most useful.
Our July speaker, local Springfield attorney Hobart Pardue, Esq., delivered an informative preseentation on his years in the courtroom and kept the audience’s rapt attention with his “rest of the stories!” If you missed this one, he agreed to give us another installment from his forthcoming book next year, tentatively scheduled for July 19, 2018 – if this is not hunting season somewhere.
My how times have changed…Livingston Parish’s weather in 1855: Thanks to Livingston Parish history buff and Vietnam Veteran, Earl McCarroll, for finding this most interesting weather description from 1855: “Several of the planters in the Piny Woods and even in the Felicianas, have to travel from five to eight miles to water their cattle. Every stream, rivulet and pond (many of which had not been known to dry within memory of the oldest inhabitant) are drained of their last drop–creating considerable mortality among the cattle ranging in the woods, to the detriment and ruin of many growers, whose very means of subsistence is in the cattle market.” – The Baton Rouge Gazette.
“In some parts of Livingston Parish, immense cane lands have been on fire for more than a month, and it is doubtful whether the Colyel will be able to stop the ravages of the fire. The cracking and bursting of the cane can be heard at a half a mile distance, and the appearance of that country is gloomy. Unless we have rain very soon, the raising of any crops this year in this section will be a visionary idea. In some places the plant sugar cane thrives slowly, but stubble is completely ruined.” – Feliciana Democrat, May 12, 1855, p. 19.
Ancestry’s Independence Day ad: If you didn’t see the photo of contemporary muti-ethnic descendants of the signers of the Declaration of Independence during July, you can view it here: http://huffp.st/uvjUn95
Slave records at Southern University in Baton Rouge: Are any Livingston Parish slave reminiscences recorded in this collection? It can be viewed at www.lib.subr.edu; click on the “Slave Narratives” graphic on the right. If you find any, let me know.
In memoriam of Mr. Jeff Hughes: A former Livingston Parish resident, ELHA speaker, retired forestry executive and father of Louisiana Supreme Court Judge Jeff Hughes, III, died June 29. His full obituary is available here: http://obits.nola.com/obituaries/nola/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=185959886.
Upcoming meetings & speakers: Sept. 21- Mrs. Mary Sharp Broussard, our own historian and genealogist will review the long life and career of Baptist preacher, Rev. J. F. Arceneaux.
Oct. 19 – Kenny Kleinpeter and “More Tales from Exploration of Cemeteries @the Main Library in Livingston. This is tenetative because Kenny may still be milking cows full time.
ELHA meetings and membership are open to the public. Meetings are held at the Main Library on Iowa St. in Livingston on the third Thursday of each month (with occasional exceptions) at 6 pm. Annual membership dues are $10 person/$15 family. For more information, email Clark Forrest at ecforrestjr@gmail.com.
This and all other columns and articles, including archives of past issues, are available online on our websites, livingstonbusiness.com. and thebusinessjournal-LA.com.